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Tree Planting Instructions

SUGGESTIONS FOR PLANTING PINE TREES
Here are a few tips to maximize survival and growth of your trees.

BEFORE PLANTING:
1. Pick up tree by container (not the trunk).

2. Prevent the roots from freezing by planting immediately or if not possible, cover container with tarp or sawdust.
3 Pines love sunshine. For best results, pick a location where your trees will get 5+ hours of sunshine.
4. Make sure you have good drainage. Pines will not survive where the soil stays wet for long periods.

5. Prune sparingly. Examine the tree closely for injury to roots or branches. If any roots are crushed, cut them at a point
just in front of the break. On the top, prune only broken branches. Begin corrective pruning after a full season of
growth
in the new location. The only time to prune pines is in mid-June.
6. Plant trees as soon possible after receiving them. Keep the roots moist until planting by watering every few days.

PLANTING:
1. Dig a large planting hole. The planting hole should be dug as deep as the root ball and twice as wide. A large -sized
hole is important because as the tree begins to take hold in the ground, its root must push
through the surrounding soil. Roots will have a difficult time if the soil is rocky or compact; however, if the soil has
been loosened by digging and backfilling, the roots will have room to establish well.
2. Place the tree at the proper height. Add a sufficient amount of amended soil to the planting hole to bring the tree to
or slightly above its original growing level. Planting at the proper height is important because if plants are set too
deep, the lower trunk can be damaged or the roots may suffocate; on the other hand, if the tree is set too shallow, the
roots may dry out in the air and sun. If circling roots are found when a tree is removed from its pot, gently pry the
bottom of the root system apart and spread the roots out as much as possible.

3. Backfill the hole with amended soil gently but firmly. Fill the hole to the top with a mixture of soil and peat. Tamp
firmly with your foot. Water thoroughly to settle the soil and eliminate air pockets. Rake a ridge of soil two to four
inches high around the edge of the hole to serve as a reservoir when watering.

AFTER PLANTING:
1. Mulch the tree. Shredded bark or wood chips are good choices. A 4-6 inch thick and four foot diameter layer of
mulch conserves soil moisture, protects newly planted tree roots from hot and cold temperatures, and keeps down
grassy weeds which compete with the trees for nutrients and water. Pull mulch one inch away from direct contact with
the tree trunk to prevent trunk rot.

2. Water regularly. Keep the soil moist but not soaked, as over watering can drastically reduce the oxygen supply.
Water trees at least once a week, barring rain, and more frequently during hot weather. The first two years watering
pines is critical.

Stop watering in mid-October. Your trees need to begin the process of going into dormancy.

3. Protect the tree from deer. Unfortunately deer love white pines and can kill pines at two times of the year. In mid-
September thru mid-December, bucks love to rub their new antlers on pine trees. In January, February, and March,
deer are searching for something green and will eat the pine needles. Spraying hot sauce, mothballs, hanging a bar of
soap or placing blood meal around the tree are all ways to discourage the deer. The best deer repellent is a cylinder
made of chicken wire placed around the tree and staked down.



SUGGESTIONS FOR PLANTING MAPLE AND PEAR TREES
Here are a few tips to maximize survival and growth of your trees.

BEFORE PLANTING:
1. Pick up tree by container (not the trunk).

2. Prevent the roots from freezing by planting immediately or if not possible, cover container with tarp or
sawdust.
3 Maples and pears will do well in a sunny location but will tolerate partial shade well. Fall color will be best in
full sun.
4. Prune sparingly. Examine the tree closely for injury to roots or branches. If any roots are crushed, cut them at a point
just in front of the break. On the top, prune only broken branches. Begin corrective pruning after a full season of
growth in the new location.
5. Plant trees as soon possible after receiving them.. Keep the roots moist until planting by watering every few days.

PLANTING:
1. Dig a large planting hole. The planting hole should be dug as deep as the root ball and twice as wide. A large-sized
hole is important because as the tree begins to take hold in the ground, its root must push through the surrounding soil.
Roots will have a difficult time if the soil is rocky or compact; however, if the soil has been loosened by digging and
backfilling, the roots will have room to establish well.
2. Place the tree at the proper height. Add a sufficient amount of amended soil to the planting hole to bring the tree to
or slightly above its original growing level. Planting at the proper height is important because if plants are set too deep,
the lower trunk can be damaged or the roots may suffocate; on the other hand, if the tree is set too shallow, the roots
may dry out in the air and sun. If circling roots are found when a tree is removed from its pot, gently pry the bottom of
the root system apart and spread the roots out as much as possible.

3. Backfill the hole with amended soil gently but firmly. Fill the hole to the top with a mixture of soil and peat. Tamp
firmly with your foot. Water thoroughly to settle the soil and eliminate air pockets. Rake a ridge of soil two to four
inches high around the edge of the hole to serve as a reservoir when watering.

AFTER PLANTING:
1. Mulch the tree. Shredded bark or wood chips are good choices. A 4-6 inch thick and four foot diameter layer of
mulch conserves soil moisture, protects newly planted tree roots from hot and cold temperatures, and keeps down
grassy weeds which compete with the trees for nutrients and water. Pull mulch one inch away from direct contact with
the tree trunk to prevent trunk rot.

2. Water regularly. Keep the soil moist but not soaked, as over watering can drastically reduce the oxygen supply.
Water trees at least once a week, barring rain, and more frequently during hot weather. The first five years watering
maples and pears is critical.

Stop watering in mid-October. Your trees need to begin the process of going into dormancy.


CREPE MYRTLE PLANTING INSTRUCTIONS
1. Crepe myrtles like full sun and, ideally, moist fertile soil, either loam or clay.
2. The more organic matter in it such as peat moss, compost or decayed sawdust, the better.
3. The best time to transplant is late spring or early summer when the young plant is actively growing.
4. Keep the shrub moist until planting time.
5. Remove the container or burlap wrappings, taking care to keep the soil ball intact.
6. Gently spread any matted, tangled roots that protrude from the soil ball, clipping those that might be
coiled from an overlong stay in the container.
7. Dig a hole wide enough to accommodate the soil ball and just as deep as it is.
8. Set the shrub in the hole, taking care that the surface of the soil ball is even with or slightly above
ground level.
9. Fill the hole with soil, gently firming it over the root ball and water generously. Do not fertilize at this
time.
For hedges, space young shrubs 4 or 5 feet apart



 

 

 

 

Lives Under Construction Boys Ranch, Inc.
296 Boys Ranch Road  ~  Lampe, MO 65681
Contact Person: Ken Ortman, Administrator
Phone: 417-779-5374     Fax: 417-779-
2106
Send mail to sheila@lucboys.org with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright 2003  Lives Under Construction Boys Ranch, Inc.


 

 

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